Sustainable Sites Initiative™ (SITES) Pilot Program

[img_assist|nid=423|title=|desc=|link=none|align=left|width=70|height=46]William McDonough + Partners has four projects in the Sustainable Sites Initiative™ (SITES) pilot program: The Lower 9th Ward Sustainable Infrastructure project (shown here in renderings by Siteworks), American University’s School of International Service, The Meadow Farm Residence, and 2001 Market Street. Launched in 2005, SITES represents a partnership of the American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) , the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center at The University of Texas at Austin and the , the United States Botanic Garden to fill a critical gap in green design, construction and maintenance by creating voluntary guidelines and performance benchmarks for sustainable landscapes of all kinds, with or without buildings. The pilot program marks the next phase of SITES – putting to the test a rating system created by dozens of the country’s leading sustainability experts, scientists and design professionals, with public input from hundreds of individuals and dozens of organizations. We are delighted to be so well represented in this pilot program and extend our congratulations to our clients and our collaborators on these projects.

Lower Ninth Ward Sustainable Infrastructure Project

  • New Orleans, Louisiana
  • Project Type: Transportation corridors/Streetscape
  • Project Team: Make It Right Foundation, William McDonough + Partners, BNIM Architects, Siteworks Studio, Hood Design, DJ+PELA, MCG, Burk-Kleinpeter Inc., Olsson & Associates

Description: The Lower Ninth Ward Sustainable Infrastructure Project began as a city project for infrastructure replacement in the flood damaged neighborhood in New Orleans. Make It Right was invited to coordinate design services due to their pioneering success using pervious concrete as an alternative to traditional pavement. The project evolved into a highly collaborative multi-disciplinary effort to develop an innovative streetscape design within the flood-damaged project site.

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